Tag Archives: Identity

Illinois Court Rejects Heightened First Amendment Protections for Anonymous Internet Speech

On June 1, 2010, the Illinois Appellate Court in Maxon v. Ottawa Publishing Co.reversed a dismissal of a petition seeking the the identity of anonymous comment posters on a newspaper’s website.   The comments implied that the plaintiffs bribed officials to change a zoning ordinance.  The newspaper argued that the poster’s identity was constitutionally protected, but the court found that the First Amendment was not implicated.  Instead, the court ruled that Illinois Supreme Court Rule 224 permits petitioners to seek the identity of the anonymous poster prior to filing a Complaint for the purpose of identifying a potential defendant.  In a defamation action, Rule 224 requires that the potential plaintiff file a verified petition stating why the discovery is necessary and alleging facts with particularity that would establish a cause of action for defamation against the unnamed potential defendant.

Courts in other jurisdictions, such as New Jersey and Delaware, have held that there is a First Amendment right to speak anonymously and therefore require that a petition show: (1) that the poster has been notified of the potential claim so they have the opportunity to appear; (2) the exact statements purportedly made by the anonymous poster; (3) that the allegations meet a prima facie standard and can withstand a hypothetical motion for summary judgment.  This strict test protects the First Amendment right to speak anonymously from being chilled by meritless defamation claims.

However, the Maxon court rejected the argument “that anonymous internet speakers enjoy a higher degree of protection from claims of defamation than the private individual who has a cause of action against him for defamation.”  TheMaxon court found that the requirements of Rule 224 and that a plaintiff state a cause of action through factual allegations was sufficient to require disclosure of the identity of the anonymous poster and that  “once the petitioner has made out aprima facie case for defamation, the potential defendant has no First Amendment right to balance against the petitoner’s right to seek redress for damage to his reputation, as it is well settled that there is no First Amendment right to defame.”

One Justice dissented, reasoning that the greater requirement of demonstrating that the Complaint  would survive a motion for summary judgment “furthers the goal of compelling identification of anonymous internet speakers only as a means to redress legitimate misuses of speech rather than as a means to retaliate against or chill legitimate uses of speech.”

Maxon points to the divergent paths that courts are taking on the issue of anonymous internet posts.  Some courts have favored a First Amendment protection of anonymous speech, while Maxon favored potential plaintiffs seeking relief for defamatory speech.  These conflicting results will likely continue in the absence of additional state supreme court decisions.  Ultimately, the United States Supreme Court may have to address the speech rights of anonymous internet posters.